December 29, 2020

[VIDEO DESCRIPTION:  Deaf Interpreter Romduol Ngov is a Khmer genderfluid person with short black hair and tan skin.  Romduol  is wearing a dark olive green sweater with the sleeves pushed up, sitting in front of a black background looking at the camera.]

Disclaimer: This transcript is a back translation of the Latent Interpretation and is not intended to be a verbatim reproduction of the original message.  For questions, comments, and feedback, please email latentimedia@gmail.com  Thank you!

TRANSCRIPT:

[IMAGE DESCRIPTIONS: [top left corner] Picture of Dr. Mark Ghaly, is a white bald-headed man with transparent glasses. He is standing in front of a tree and is smiling at the camera. Dr. Ghaly is wearing a grey suit, white shirt, and a red and grey tie.]

[WHITE TEXT [UNDER DR. GHALY] Dr. Mark Ghaly, December 29, 2020]

[bottom left corner: White text: This video made possible by Access Language]

[Logo of two circles on white background, one is smaller circle within a larger circle.  Within the smaller circle is two letter A L done in calligraphy style. Between both circles on the bottom are the uppercased text ACCESS LANGUAGE.]

 

DEAF INTERPRETER: Hello, I am Romduol and will be interpreting for Dr. Mark Ghaly today for December 29th. He discussed three main points.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A group of doctors and nurses of various genders and skin tones. They are all looking down towards an open folder.]

DR. GHALY: First, I want to talk about the hospitals in California, like how many doctors and nurses are available in a hospital.  Such as are there 1, 2 , 3, 40, 30, or 20 doctors?  Are they able to take care of all sick persons there?

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Several doctors in full personal protective equipment surround a patient in a hospital ICU bed. They are all looking towards a screen with the patient’s vitals.]

DR. GHALY: Is there enough hospital equipment, such as medicine, vaccines, and ventilators to meet these demands? This is the first topic I will be discussing. Next, I will elaborate on the factors that influence when hospitals accept patients or send them home. Lastly, I will elaborate on the current status of the COVID-19, whether it has increased or decreased.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A group of doctors and nurses of various genders and skin tones. They are all looking down towards an open folder.]

DR. GHALY: We have been monitoring hospitals all around California to see how much doctors and nurses they have. 5? 10? 20? 30? 40?

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A city map with a hospital GPS pin and arrows following the road, leading to another hospital GPS pin. Along the route are a stethoscope, doctor with personal protective equipment, and a syringe.]

DR. GHALY: If one place only has 5 doctors and needs more, we will search among other hospitals. If one has a lot of doctors such as 40, we will ask if they can loan perhaps 5 or 10 doctors to the first hospital. Also, we are looking for specific areas where hospitals are running low on supplies such as stethoscopes, ventilators, medicine, or resuscitators. That way we can try to make sure those hospitals are getting what they need. Remember how back in March when COVID-19 first hit all over the United States, hospitals did not have enough supplies such as masks and gloves. They ran out so quickly because they were not prepared for it. Now we already ordered masks, gloves, face shields, PPEs, and so on. But we still need to look at what hospitals might be lacking. It turns out, hospitals around California do not have enough doctors and nurses. Hospitals are overwhelmed with the large number of people getting sick and needing care. There are a lot of patients coming in everyday, and the hospital staff needs more doctors and nurses.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A hospital appears busy with nurses, doctors and a few patients. Most people are standing around, but one is walking.]

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A hospital room is crowded with patients and doctors. There is barely any room to move around.]

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A clipart image of various injuries and illnesses, including a cast, fever symptoms, flu symptoms, back pain and arm pain.]

DR. GHALY: COVID-19 is not the only reason people are going to hospitals. People are still catching other sickness like the common cold or cough, and having other health issues such as skin reactions, broken bones, being in a car accident, or needing surgery. This is leading to a situation where there are not enough doctors to treat them.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A city map with a hospital GPS pin and arrows following the road, leading to another hospital GPS pin. Along the route are a stethoscope, doctor with personal protective equipment, and a syringe.]

DR. GHALY: We are asking hospitals that do have enough doctors and nurses to send them to the hospitals that do not have enough. There are a lot of hospitals that currently need this support. For now we are doing okay but we do not want to let the situation become serious. We do not want to allow hospitals to run out of supplies. If any hospital does not have enough of something, we will make sure to support them so that they have what they need to continue saving lives.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Two unmasked doctors in a paper gown and gloves give something to a young child, also unmasked, who is wearing a cap and siting in a hospital bed. The child and one of the doctors is smiling.]

DR. GHALY: Now I will discuss factors that influence whether a patient is admitted into the hospital for treatment or sent home and why the hospital staff has to make these decisions. All people are equally deserving of medical care, and the doctors and nurses must respect that.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: clipart of several people standing in a crowd, all different genders, skin colors, and hair color/styles, looking in different directions, all with white masks covering nose and mouth.]

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: clip art of a light skin person with red/orange curly hair and mouth open to speak and another person with dark skin and dark short hair with a smile and hand pointing to ear to gesture that they are deaf. International red no (circle with a slash) symbol between the hearing and deaf persons to show that they can’t discriminate between the two.]

DR. GHALY: For example, if two people go into the hospital, one is Deaf and the other is hearing, the hospital staff cannot tend to the hearing patient and ignore the Deaf patient. Despite the language barrier, the Deaf patient deserves quality treatment just like the hearing person.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: A black person and a white person shake hands.]

DR. GHALY: If one patient is white and the other is a person of color and they enter at the same time, the hospital staff can’t help the white person first while the person of color has to wait for hours. That would be unacceptable. All people that need hospital care are to be treated equally. If one person arrives first, then they can receive care first, and then move onto the next. If a person of color is describing their symptoms, the doctor should not brush them off and tell them nothing is wrong. They should receive necessary tests, such as blood tests, or nasal swabs to determine their health just like everyone else. All patients should be listened to and taken seriously by the healthcare providers. People of all backgrounds, race, economic status, and gender—disabled people, homeless people, immigrants, and U.S. citizens, etc. must be treated and cared for equally. If someone needs hospital care, whoever they are, they deserve equal access to that care. We are currently working on improving this issue in our hospitals so that everyone gets the support and healthcare that they deserve.

[WHITE TEXT: County Changes:

Humboldt County from PURPLE to RED

PURPLE – 54

RED – 3

ORANGE – 1

YELLOW – 0]

DR. GHALY: Lastly, I am going to discuss the COVID-19 status, what zones we are in—red, orange, purple, or yellow. As a reminder, the purple zone represents the largest amount of people that have contracted Covid-19. The next zone is red where still a lot of people have the virus. Next is orange where some people have it, and last is the yellow zone where the least amount of people have the virus. The current status looks like this [pic].

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Chart showing the top bar is purple is widespread with more than 7 daily cases per 100 and more than 8% positive tests. The second bar is red which is substantial with 4-7 daily cases per 100 and 5 to 8% positive tests. The third bar is orange which is moderate with 1-3.9 daily cases per 100 and 2 to 4.9% positive tests.  Bottom ar is yellow which is minimal with less than 1 daily new cases per 100 and less than 2% positive tests.]

DR. GHALY: As you can see, many areas are still in the purple zone. The purple zone is the worst one, it means that a lot of people have the virus. The COVID-19 epidemic has been going on for a long time, and it is still a very serious situation.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: This image has four sections. The top section shows soapy hands with the word “Wash” in orange. Under that, a brown haired person wearing a blue mask with the word “Cover” in blue. Under that, an unlabeled blue spray bottle with the word “Clean” in orange. At the bottom, a woman standing with an arrow next to the words “6 Feet” in blue.]

DR. GHALY: It is vital that everyone follows the safety guidelines such as wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands, and avoiding close interactions. In Southern California and San Joaquin is still keeping a strict home-in-place mandate. Their hospitals are extremely overwhelmed with patients.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: State of California map with five regions outlined in white.  Southern California, San Joaquin Valley, Bay Area, and Greater Sacramento are filled in blue while Northern California is filled in gray.]

DR. GHALY: They have no more space in their ICU’s. These are rooms reserved for emergency cases. Too many people have used up the space so there is no more room. Many people who need emergency care are being turned away at hospitals because there is no room for them.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Several doctors in full personal protective equipment surround a patient in a hospital ICU bed. They are all looking towards a screen with the patient’s vitals.]

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Hospital parking lot filled with empty beds outside in the open air. The beds are outside because the inside of the hospital is full.]

DR. GHALY: Because of this they are extending the time in which people are required to stay home. The situation in Northern California is concerning and ICU availability is doing down. We must stay home, keep our distance from each other, and wear masks. Thank you.

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: State of California map with five regions outlined in white.  Southern California, San Joaquin Valley, Bay Area, and Greater Sacramento are filled in blue while Northern California is filled in gray.]

[FULL SCREEN IMAGE: Picture of Governor Newsom and WHITE TEXT: PRESS CONFERENCE]

END OF TRANSCRIPT

Disclaimer: This transcript is a back translation of the Latent Interpretation and is not intended to be a verbatim reproduction of the original message.  For questions, comments, and feedback, please email latentimedia@gmail.com Thank you!